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Light Cahill Parachute

by Tim Flagler

These past couple of years, here in the Mid-Atlantic, the light cahills have been one of the premier hatches. For me anyway, they are the last major hatch before waters warm up so much to the point where I can no longer conscientiously catch and release trout. Prior to the hatch, trout readily feed on light cahill nymphs trying to make it to the water’s surface and on emergers struggling in the surface film. Of course, they’re extremely fond of the winged adults riding on top of the water. When egg-laden Spinners return to the water to deposit those eggs is when the fun really starts. After the eggs are deposited, the Spinners at the very end of their life cycle fall spent on the water’s surface, and the trout go absolutely nuts for such an easy meal. I use this parachute-style light cahill pattern to imitate nearly all of the insect’s life cycle, save for the nymphal stage.

Light Cahill Parachute with a twist

Detailed instructions for tying a parachute style Light Cahill dry fly. Recipe: Hook: Dry fly hook (here a Lightning Strike DF1), size 14. Thread: White Semperfli Classic Waxed, 12/0. Wingpost: White polypropylene floating yarn. Tail: Woodduck flank feather. Body: Light Cahill-colored Superfine dubbing. Hackle: Cream-colored cape hackle.

Recipe:
Hook: Dry fly hook (here a Lightning Strike DF1), size 14.
Thread: White Semperfli Classic Waxed, 12/0.
Wingpost: White polypropylene floating yarn.
Tail: Woodduck flank feather.
Body: Light Cahill-colored Superfine dubbing.
Hackle: Cream-colored cape hackle.